Saturday, April 13, 2013

To the Casket Dealer

Bertha Taliaferro died November 15 1930 at 5AM. Embalming was not a practice in rural communities in Mississippi. Her family and friends would wash and prepare her body for burial.

Print Henley and Carrie Singleton, children of the deceased, went to the casket dealer Oscar J Young for a casket. Young was a farmer in 1900 but by 1910 he was a salesman and used a vehicle in his business, by 1920 he had a store. They may have looked around at what Young had or asked for the standard casket. They chose a half couch casket at the price of $150. They also got a robe, and hearse service was $10 additional.

Did Young bring the casket to the home, or did Bertha's children bring the casket with them in a horse driven wagon?

Bertha was buried the next day following her death, November 16 1930. She was buried in the Hunters Cemetery, likely next to her husband Thomas Taliaferro.

Sources:
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA-OWI Collection, [reproduction number, e.g., LC-USF35-1326]
Federal Pension Records of Thomas Taliaferro

6 comments:

  1. Interesting post. . . I've sometimes wondered when funeral homes became popular in rural Pennsylvania. I have a vague memory of attending a funeral at a home when I was a small child.

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    1. I have bits of memories of my paternal grandfather's funeral in 1960. His body was brought to the house for his wake, my grandmother spent most of the night in the room with his casket. The funeral was held in a church.

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  2. I am researching the plantation of Peachy Ridgway Taliaferro. I am looking for any information you may have on the plantation, slaves, ANYTHING! We are looking to find the connection between the closing of the plantation and the how Peachy's son Richard Henery Taliaferro found himself in Kansas. I would love if you would e-mail me at rikkijoan1206@gmail.com so we could connect we have many questions and any information would be wonderful and I am looking into our family history to compile a chart of information. This would be so greatly appreciated! Your Blog has been wonderful already!

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    1. I will respond to your personal email address.

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  3. The photographs make is so immediate. I really like the way you put this whole post together.

    Growing up in Deetroit, I don't remember any at home viewings. In fact, my mother was very firm about me and my sister not going to funerals so the first one I attended was after I was grown. She lost two brothers as a child and they were viewed at home. She was about 6 when her 7 year old brother died so maybe the way she felt made her do what she did.

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    1. Thank you, Kristin. I attended many funerals when I was a child, which is why I totally agree with your mother, children should not attend funerals.

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